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Thursday, March 31, 2005

 
Some time ago I posted a link to an American Phishing test. I'm pleased to tell you that there is now a UK Phishing Test using UK examples that might make rather more sense to us than the American one. Phishing, for those who don't know, are fake emails that supposedly come from banks etc. that are designed to get us to give out personal details, which can then be used to get money out of accounts and so on. No-one would fall for them, surely? If you're sure you're too clever then try the test and see how well you do!
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93% of MailFrontier’s UK IQ Phishing Test-Takers Get At Least One Wrong

One week after launch, nearly 12,000 people take the UK test to see whether they can spot a fraud from a legitimate email

Just one week after it launched, 11,832 people have taken the UK version of the IQ Phishing Test from MailFrontier. Designed to test and educate users on how to identify fraudulent email, the overwhelming majority of test-takers chose the wrong answer for at least one question.

Full results: 7th April

Test takers: 11,832
100% Count: 879
Number who got at least one wrong: 10,953
100% Percentage: 7.4%
Average score: 70.9%

The ten test emails are all real life examples caught by MailFrontier’s Desktop product user army, who then report them back to the company at the click of a button. This means that, had they appeared in people’s email systems in real life, a significant number of people would not be able to tell a real email from a fraudulent one.
 
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